Live Work Play 2013 Schedule

  • Thursday, Jan. 17 – Nomination period begins for Live Work Play 2013
  • Friday, Feb. 22 – Deadline for People's Choice Award nominations
  • Tuesday, March 5 – Voting begins for Live Work Play People’s Choice winner
  • Noon Friday, March 15 - Deadline for Way to Go Commuter Awards
  • Noon Friday, April 19 – Reservation deadline for Live Work Play celebration event
  • Noon Wednesday, April 24 – People’s Choice voting ends
  • 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, April 24 – Live Work Play 2013 event, including announcement of People's Choice award winner and presentation of Way to Go Commuter Awards. McNichols Civic Center Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave. (corner of Colfax and Bannock), Denver
  • January 2015 - New call for entries

Your              Finalists (in random order)!
Welcome to Live Work Play 2013, the Denver Regional Council of Governments' (DRCOG) brand-new and exciting awards program celebrating great places and livable communities in the Denver region.
Seniors’ Choice
Seniors’ Choice
Seniors’ Choice adult day program is licensed by the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environm More >>
Description:
Seniors’ Choice adult day program is licensed by the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment and has been in a part of the Aurora community since 1989. This adult day program was founded by Developmental Pathways, (DP). DP is the Community Centered Board serving clients in Arapahoe & Douglas counties and the city of Aurora. Senior’s Choice (now under the service provider arm of DP called Continuum of Colorado) is unique in that we blend typical seniors with senior clients with intellectual disabilities. Continuum and Developmental Pathways are both 501 (c) 3 non-profit organizations. We offer a safe and caring environment for families caring for seniors in their home. This provides your family member opportunities for socialization to make new friends. Continuum of Colorado is a licensed Home Health Agency and provides in-home supports in the Denver-Metro area. • Evidence of community investment: After many years operating in cramped spaces the Seniors Choice program went through a major over haul to combine several rooms into one large program space. This allowed us to have a better line of sight on all our clients and provide a safer environment. We also revamped our cafeteria area and handicap accessible bathrooms. • Organizational capacity and vision: In 2012 the board of DP made a major commitment to reach out to our community partners and stakeholders. A conscious effort has been made to by a Presentation Committee and the development of a Community Outreach Department to meet with local non-profit boards, school districts, parents, local businesses and government and advocacy groups to present our new vision (Enriching Lives. Strengthening Communities) and promote transparency. • Merchant and property owner leadership: Besides Senior Choice, DP has upgraded office space for Continuum of Colorado staff. We are building a state-of-the art facility to offer and provide home health worker training to all Home Health Agencies in the metro area. • Neighborhood and community engagement: We recently installed a new sign in front of our Aurora location. We have intentionally left spaces to add new businesses. We would like to offer tenant space to other personal care type businesses the will add value to the overall services to our clients and the community.

Lone Tree's RidgeGate Community
Lone Tree's RidgeGate Community
RidgeGate is a sustainable community that is evolving where the city meets the prairie, an eco-smart More >>
Description:
RidgeGate is a sustainable community that is evolving where the city meets the prairie, an eco-smart blend of urban and open space. Its location in Lone Tree places it in one of the most thriving regions in the Denver metropolitan area. Retail, dining, and office centers are all within walking distance of diverse homes in village settings. Urban amenities, open space bluffs, parks and mountain views all make RidgeGate a community designed for health, wellness and peace of mind. RidgeGate is developing according to plan as a compact, mixed-use community where people live, work, shop and recreate in a pedestrian-friendly environment. One of the few communities that continued to grow during the recent recession, RidgeGate will eventually span 3,500 acres, just south of Lincoln Avenue, straddling both sides of I-25. The community will continue to develop carefully, with a long-term commitment to walkability, livability, access, amenities and overall quality of life. Convenient access to transportation is a high priority, with an existing RTD light rail station near Lincoln Avenue serving the community, and three more stations planned within the RidgeGate boundaries. RidgeGate offers a diverse blend of homes, including apartments, townhomes, courtyard patio homes, and detached single-family homes. Over 1,000 homes have been built or are under construction. RidgeGate is home to the first all-solar neighborhood in Colorado. The growing Lincoln Commons center features a Sprouts Farmers Market, several restaurants and a Super Target. RidgeGate Commons, the community’s newest retail district, will be home to the sporting goods leader Cabela’s, scheduled to open in August 2013. The Sky Ridge Medical Center is the anchor to a growing medical sector in Lone Tree. The hospital plans to break ground on a 90-bed expansion in just a few months. A new hotel opened in December 2012 and another will be under construction in 2013. Finally, as further testimony of the true mixed-use Live Work Play character of RidgeGate, Charles Schwab recently announced the development of new a corporate campus, bringing 2,500 jobs to the heart of the community. The LEED-certified Lone Tree Arts Center opened in August 2011 and has become a model for the performing arts by collaborating with some of the premier Colorado performing arts companies to present their productions in Lone Tree as well as presenting national and regional tours. The Lone Tree Recreation Center has been serving the greater Lone Tree community since 2004. Over 1,000 acres in RidgeGate have been devoted to parks, trails, wildlife habitat and open space, with the community flanked by the dramatic vistas of Bluffs Regional Park. RidgeGate’s focus is to provide a living, working and playing environment that contributes to the health and wellness of all residents.

Town of Bennett Comprehensive Plan
Town of Bennett Comprehensive Plan
The Bennett Comprehensive Plan is a bold vision for community planning with achievable goals that im More >>
Description:
The Bennett Comprehensive Plan is a bold vision for community planning with achievable goals that immediately enable the Town and its regional stakeholders to cooperatively guide future land use in the eastern I-70 corridor. Several factors make the Bennett 2012 Comprehensive plan project outstanding: 1. A bold vision for community planning. The Town of Bennett is uniquely positioned to capture the next wave of growth of the Denver metropolitan area. Bennett’s close proximity to Denver International Airport, Front Range Airport, I –70, E-470, and the Union Pacific Railroad are all factors which will have a direct impact on the future growth of the Town, an incorporated area that currently totals 5.4 square miles. Bennett’s community leaders are visionary and took bold steps to secure the Town’s future. As a first step in implementing recommendations from a study recently completed for the I-70 Regional Economic Advancement Partnership, the Town identified a 91.4-square-mile comprehensive plan study area. Bennett, with a 2010 population of just 2,300 residents, engaged representatives of Adams County, Arapahoe County, the City of Aurora, and the Denver Regional Council of Governments in a planning process that fostered intergovernmental coordination and cooperation. 2. A focus on achievable goals. The Bennett 2012 Comprehensive Plan is structured around a Preferred Scenario that serves as the heart of the plan, and eight plan themes: Neighborhoods, Employment, Open Lands, Transportation, Services and Infrastructure, Community Health, Annexation, and Intergovernmental Relations. Each plan theme contains a single achievable goal, and each achievable goal is supported by a key strategy, catalyst action and one or more policy directives. By focusing elected and appointed officials throughout the eastern I-70 corridor on what is achievable, and limiting the number of strategies and actions to those that are vitally important, plan implementation is immediately activated and objectives can be accomplished in a much shorter period of time than is typical of a traditional comprehensive plan. 3. A bias for action. To be successful, comprehensive planning must be an ongoing activity. Plan monitoring involves establishing accountability tools for tracking progress over time. The 2012 Bennett Comprehensive Plan includes a progress matrix, a basic plan monitoring tool that identifies timeframes for the accomplishment of catalyst actions: short-term (one to three years), mid-term (three to five years), and long-term (five years and beyond). 4. A planning document designed for effective communication. The 2012 Bennett Comprehensive Plan is formatted as a 16-page letter-sized booklet. The booklet contains text and graphics describing achievable goals, key strategies, catalyst actions and policy directives, with a full color preferred scenario map as its centerpiece. The "summary style" comprehensive planning document provides a straight-forward, cost-effective, and user-friendly synopsis of the Town's land use planning objectives. Multiple copies can be easily produced, distributed and understood very quickly by citizens, public officials and project applicants.

TAXI Community
TAXI Community
Since Zeppelin Development completed the original Yellow Cab building redevelopment in 2000, the TAX More >>
Description:
Since Zeppelin Development completed the original Yellow Cab building redevelopment in 2000, the TAXI site in the industrial zone of Northeast Denver has become home to hundreds of new economy entrepreneurs. Tenants at TAXI include graphic design firms, architecture firms including award-winning 4240 Architecture, and creative startups like Craftsy.com, an online education site focused on knitting and quilting. TAXI also continually provides an inspiring and creative environment for events. This past summer, over 50 events took place at TAXI including the Urban Land Institute, National Real Estate Editors, City Council of Salt Lake City, Early Childhood Education Conference, National Water Conference, any number of charitable organizations, food trucks, and a multitude of small groups who seek out TAXI for stimulation. TAXI is a community that understands the importance of providing spaces to live, work, and play. In addition to creative office spaces and “crash pad” residences, amenities such as a fitness center, early childhood education center, pool, salon, plazas, gardens, coffee shop, and two restaurants contribute to TAXI’s daily livability. The spirit of creative collaboration and place-making that began at TAXI has since created a ripple effect throughout RiNo. The River North neighborhood has seen increasing reinvestment along the Brighton Boulevard corridor and Larimer Street. Film studios, galleries, restaurants and cafes have sprung up in former warehouses, auto garages, and manufacturing plants in recent years. Additionally, Zeppelin Development is building an indoor artisan market on Brighton Boulevard called The Source. Housed in a brick 1880s iron foundry, The Source will include a butcher, cheese counter, coffee roaster, brewer, and other craft food producers and purveyors all within a soaring industrial space. Zeppelin Development is actively working with the city and other interests to realize lateral pedestrian and bicycle connections between TAXI, Upper Larimer, and Brighton Boulevard in order to help stitch the neighborhood together and allow the broader community to take advantage of The Source and TAXI’s on-site services. Collaboration with RNOs such as RiNo Neighbors, the RiNo Arts District, and others is prioritized as well in these and other efforts towards exporting TAXI’s successes and making the neighborhood truly livable. As new properties are developed at the TAXI site, an increasing critical mass of high-tech firms and creative economy businesses that prioritize community and livability for their employees are transforming RiNo into Denver’s creative epicenter. TAXI is committed to continually pushing the creative place-making envelope.

Colorado Wedding District
Colorado Wedding District
The Colorado Wedding District is located in the heart of downtown Castle Rock. It was established to More >>
Description:
The Colorado Wedding District is located in the heart of downtown Castle Rock. It was established to capture a niche market that is seemingly recession-proof. The goals are oriented toward the entire community. Long-term, the Downtown Development Authority will generate an atmosphere that lends itself to one-stop shopping for weddings. This concept not only provides products and services for those planning their special day, it also brings more guests to downtown Castle Rock. As the concept continues to evolve, downtown merchants will have the opportunity to capture the attention of newlyweds seeking to set up their homes, or grow their families. Additionally, guests will be exposed to the vast array of dining and entertainment options that anchor the community. Ultimately, the increased awareness of all that is happening in downtown Castle Rock will have a positive ripple effect throughout the community. This concept has local, regional, and state-wide economic development and tourism implications. The momentum among present businesses is blossoming and many outside merchants are vying to be a part of the district. Downtown Castle Rock is the place to be and one to watch!

Centennial Center Park
Centennial Center Park
The 11-acre Centennial Center Park is the first City-owned and developed Park; the project was compl More >>
Description:
The 11-acre Centennial Center Park is the first City-owned and developed Park; the project was completed on schedule and under budget. Centennial Center Park is located in the center of Centennial on the north side of Arapahoe at Revere Parkway. This location was specifically chosen to provide recreation opportunities for neighborhoods and communities underserved by park facilities, and to establish a central location where citizens throughout the City could come together. The Park not only serves residents of Centennial and Arapahoe County but draws citizens from throughout the metro Denver area. A number of needs were identified by both the City and the public during the Park planning process. The Park site was acquired in early 2008, and a master plan was completed in 2009 after an extensive public outreach effort. As part of the planning process, citizens were given the opportunity to identify the types of uses and facilities they wanted in the Park. Residents expressed a lack of park facilities and recreational features, including children’s playgrounds, climbing walls, water play features and picnic facilities. The resulting plan for the Park reflected the community's vision and responded to the citizens' needs for recreation. Centennial Center Park is designed for year-round, family-friendly enjoyment. The site has many natural attributes that make it an exceptional location, including spectacular mountain vistas; changes in topography that create distinctive places; and access to the Lone Tree Creek drainage, which has the potential to provide riparian habitat and access to the region's park, open space and trail network. The Park’s features include playgrounds, water play areas, an outdoor amphitheatre, a plaza, picnic shelters, restrooms, mountain view overlooks, environmental and historical education exhibits, open space meadows, a butte, a native plant demonstration garden, climbing walls, walking trails, parking and entry gateways that provide an identity for the Park and community. Many of the materials used in the construction of the Park were found locally. The surface of the playground consists of 'poured in place’ rubber surfacing, which is made of recycled materials that provide a safe, clean, attractive and ADA accessible environment for children. Centennial Center Park opened April 27, 2012 and its success quickly became apparent. Within the first nine months, thousands visited the Park and more than 200 events were coordinated by citizens throughout the Denver metro area. In addition to numerous private events, the City of Centennial hosted three public events that were attended by thousands, including local public officials, Governor Hickenlooper and several Olympians. The usage of the Park during the first year was so high the City constructed more than 200 additional parking spaces to meet public demand. Funding and support for the $5.3 million Centennial Center Park came from a variety of sources, including Great Outdoors Colorado, DORA (Waste Tire Program), CenCON (an umbrella organization of 53 homeowner organizations and civic organizations), the Centennial Rotary Club and numerous other business and community partners.

Washington Village Cohousing
Washington Village Cohousing
Washington Village is a new cohousing neighborhood, under construction, located next to a small neig More >>
Description:
Washington Village is a new cohousing neighborhood, under construction, located next to a small neighborhood park at Cedar and 13th Street in central Boulder, Colorado that features diversity in housing types, scales of economy and within its culture. Our construction consists of a historic elementary school (adaptive reuse – 8 condos), single family homes, duplexes, town houses and flats; all of which exists under one condo map. On site there will be 8000 SF of common space consisting of 2 large gathering spaces, a large kitchen to support 33 household units (potluck dinners 2 -3 times a week), 2 guest rooms with full baths (for community members to host family and guests), a woodshop and bike repair shop, an arts and crafts room, large gallery space, a cozy library, laundry facilities and a contemplative space. Of the 33 units located on this site 10 are a part of the City of Boulders permanent affordability housing program (6 low-income and 4 middle-income). The diverse culture within Washington Village is reflected in age and experience, making it ripe for knowledge and resource sharing. Whether we are designing for aging in place or for intergenerational communities we are always promoting the highest quality architecture and neighborhood planning in order to create a vibrant atmosphere with a real sense of place. Our design achieves sustainable living in the following ways: • Empowers community members through collaboration and shared resources • Achieves an optimum balance of private and community spaces • Thoughtful designs for courtyards and landscaping elements • Strategically oriented kitchen spaces to connect neighbors • Incorporates Structural Insulated Panels (SIP walls) and Serious Windows (R5 insulation rating) • Designed with clean and elegant interior spaces with quality finishes • Planned Master bedroom suites on the main level (essential for aging in place communities) • Integrates state-of-the-art Passive Solar, Photovoltaic, Geothermal (integrated with Earth Tube technology) and other Net-Zero design concepts utilizing high performance and innovative designs designating this site as a LEED ND certified Intentional Community. This transit oriented development (TOD) is a part of a new urban design that offers more opportunities for residents to access, through various modes of transportation, the “goods” and “services” or destination points that are a part of our daily lives. TOD’s are proving to achieve higher quality of life since they celebrate walking and mass transit rather than emphasize dependencies on cars for mobility. When it comes to aging in place nothing can be more important than having accessibility to cheaper modes of transportation especially when we analyze how our national and local economic structures are maturing in today’s economy, and how those with fixed incomes have to deal with gentrification from the city. Washington Village is placed in a setting that has convenient bus transportation, bike lanes, and sidewalks. It is within walking distance to grocery, local shops, entertainment, restaurants, North Boulder Recreation Center, Boulder Community Hospital, and other amenities. Silver Sage Village Cohousing is a sister community located just north of Washington Village developed for seniors aging in place, it was completed in 2008.

Olde Town Arvada
Olde Town Arvada
Olde Town Arvada is historic jewel that was in need of redevelopment to become the vibrant heart of  More >>
Description:
Olde Town Arvada is historic jewel that was in need of redevelopment to become the vibrant heart of Arvada it once was. Through the Arvada Urban Renewal Authority (AURA), Arvada started the redevelopment work by redoing the streetscapes on Grandview Avenue and Olde Wadsworth. Concrete sidewalks were replaced with brick pavers and the streets were lined with trees, flower pots, street lamps and benches. AURA also awarded façade grants to 27 property owners to restore their buildings to their original historic look. AURA worked with a private developer to construct three new buildings on the corner of Olde Wadsworth and Grandview. These two-story buildings are now home to exciting new restaurants and retail on the ground floor with office space above. The traditional Town Square was redeveloped through integration into Arvada’s new library and contains an interactive fountain for children of all ages to run through during the summer. Olde Town Square is the centerpiece that hosts most of Olde Town’s 50 annual special events and activities, including the Holiday Tree Lighting, Scarecrow Festival and Farmer’s Market. Finally, AURA awarded the Webster Center project, located caddy corner from the Library, to a local business to construct a two-story office building on the site. AURA’s final major redevelopment effort focused on the improvement of residential opportunities. This focus resulted in the development of Water Tower Village. Located south of Olde Town, the area was blighted with sixteen apartment buildings which suffered from deferred maintenance and a high crime rate. AURA purchased 50 parcels of land, including these apartment buildings and relocated 75 families. The area now houses 600 beautiful row houses, cottages, lofts and luxury apartments. The Village is very pedestrian-oriented with alley-loaded garages, detached sidewalks, tree-lined streets, and two pocket parks. Following the completion of the initial redevelopment effort and sunset of the Urban Renewal Area, development in Olde Town Arvada is continuing. The City worked with private developers to support the renovation of two historic buildings, the A. L. Davis Building on the northeast corner of Olde Wadsworth and Grandview, and the Kars Building on the northeast corner of Olde Wadsworth and Grant. Through renovation and reuse these buildings now house new restaurants, office space and residential loft units. The development of Olde Town will continue in the near future with the coming of the Gold Line in 2016. A public-private partnership is in progress to build a five story, 152-unit high-rise apartment complex on the east side of Olde Town within a short walk to the future Olde Town Station. The Arvada City Council has appropriated over $22 million to support Gold Line “Betterment Projects” ranging from pavers for the Station Plaza to a bus transfer facility and parking structures. The City, AURA and RTD are collaborating in the development of the infrastructure necessary to support Transit-Oriented Development in Olde Town. The redevelopment, restoration, mixed use and multi-modal development of Olde Town is consistent with Metro Vision Goals and Policies.

40 West Arts District, Lakewood, CO
40 West Arts District, Lakewood, CO
The 40 West Arts District showcases what happens when vision, investment, and community and civic le More >>
Description:
The 40 West Arts District showcases what happens when vision, investment, and community and civic leadership converge. Just over three years ago, the idea of an arts district was a fledging thought suggested during a community planning meeting for the Lamar Street Station Area Plan as a way to revitalize an older, eclectic neighborhood and commercial corridor. Because of the strong partnership between the Two Creeks neighborhood, Metro West Housing Solutions (formerly Lakewood Housing Authority), the Lakewood – West Colfax Business Improvement District, the West Colfax Community Association, the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, and the City of Lakewood, the vision became reality. The 40 West Arts District formed as a non-profit and was named an Emerging Creative District by the State of Colorado. The City of Lakewood received a 2012 Gold DRCOG Local Government Award for the 40 West Arts District and related collaborative planning efforts. Since forming, the 40 West Arts District has held a number of highly successful events including INSPIRE! Lakewood’s Arts Week, The 40 West Arts RIOT, the Arts Along Colfax Program, and the 40 West Arts Fall Festival. In addition, several projects and investments have been completed, are underway, or are scheduled for the near future to capitalize on light rail, support affordable housing, promote economic health, and support existing neighborhoods. The projects further implement Metro Vision 2035 by encouraging infill and redevelopment and supporting compact development and a mix of uses that support live, work and play. The following are just a few examples of the ongoing investments and achievements in the 40 West Arts District neighborhood: • A 160-unit mixed-income housing project is being constructed by Metro West Housing Solutions, just steps from the Lamar Street station. • New mixed-use zoning has been adopted to promote high-density residential, retail, live/work units, and art studios. • The 40 West Arts District Urban Design and Mobility Concepts Plan was adopted as an amendment to the Lakewood Comprehensive Plan to further promote and enhance the Lamar Street landscape experience and to redefine the West Colfax Avenue corridor. • Funding has been secured, and plans are underway, to construct a traffic-calming roundabout in the intersection of West 14th Ave. and Lamar Street and to construct an eight-foot sidewalk from Lamar Station to West 14th Ave. The sidewalk will include an enhanced amenity zone to implement the vision of the Lamar Street Station Area Plan and the 40 West Urban Design and Mobility Plan. • A Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment grant, funded through the Environmental Protection Agency, was received, which provided recommendations for sustainable re-development in the 40 West Arts District neighborhood. The 40 West Arts District encompasses the area within approximately ½ mile of the Lamar Street Station, on the W Rail Line, opening in April 2013. It includes the Two Creeks neighborhood, the commercial corridor of West Colfax Avenue, and the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design.

Denver Botanic Gardens, Phases I & II
Denver Botanic Gardens, Phases I & II
In collaboration with Tryba Architects, The Denver Botanic Gardens reached a major milestone in 2007 More >>
Description:
In collaboration with Tryba Architects, The Denver Botanic Gardens reached a major milestone in 2007 with the completion and unanimous board-approval of the Master Development Plan. This 25-year roadmap became a strong and important vision for the future of the Gardens. Phases I and II of the Plan began the institutional transformation and included new structures and systems that would both enhance the visitor experience as well as the Gardens’ operations. Created with the Gardens’ core values --- Transformation, Sustainability, Diversity and Relevance --- as the platform, the design and new construction incorporates energy-saving strategies with environmental sustainability. The construction links educational and research components to global initiatives monitoring climate change. Among the works completed: • Bonfils Stanton Visitor’s Center combines all the essentials for visitors -- gift shop, ticketing and information desk -- with an entry courtyard • State-of-the-art interactive production and research greenhouses and Horticultural offices • 3-level green roof parking structure Attendance, membership and support of all kinds remain strong at Denver Botanic Gardens, keeping Denver in the top five most-visited botanic gardens in the country. Attendance is up from 635,000 in 2009 to 819,000 in 2011. The average number of member households in 2011 was 29,000, peaking at 30,000 in April. It was the highest membership count in Gardens’ history. The three-level, 400-foot long garage nestles two full levels into the landscape, selectively exposing portions of its architectural concrete construction between landscaped earthen berms planted with native Colorado grasses and wildflowers. The most dynamic and innovative feature of the parking garage is the Mordecai Children’s Garden. At 20,000 sf, this signature garden emerges from the landscape north of the site to seamlessly integrate into the form and structure of the two-level garage below. Supported by a waterproofed and drained double-slab system, the Children’s Garden is the largest and most successful green roof in the Rocky Mountain region and home to a full range of native Colorado plant species, deciduous and coniferous trees, native grasses and wildflowers, and several water features including a pond. Conceived in concert with the new parking structure immediately opposite York Street, the 4,500 sf Visitor Center is a compact entry pavilion combining a number of service, membership, education and retail functions under a single roof. This Welcome Garden contains a cascading recycled water fountain with runnel, integrated shaded seating areas, and an exterior informational display screen. The interior of the Visitor Center is a single, open planned space with ample west-facing glazing offering views to the gardens beyond. The pavilion houses a gift shop and “book nook”, visitor information desk, informational kiosks, offices public restrooms, and is topped with a 10Kw photovoltaic array supplying 5% of the power requirements.

Seniors’ Choice
Seniors’ Choice
Seniors’ Choice adult day program is licensed by the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment and has been in a part of the Aurora community since 1989. This adult day program was founded by Developmental Pathways, (DP). DP is the Community Centered Board serving clients in Arapahoe & Douglas counties and the city of Aurora. Senior’s Choice (now under the service provider arm of DP called Continuum of Colorado) is unique in that we blend typical seniors with senior clients with intellectual disabilities. Continuum and Developmental Pathways are both 501 (c) 3 non-profit organizations. We offer a safe and caring environment for families caring for seniors in their home. This provides your family member opportunities for socialization to make new friends. Continuum of Colorado is a licensed Home Health Agency and provides in-home supports in the Denver-Metro area. • Evidence of community investment: After many years operating in cramped spaces the Seniors Choice program went through a major over haul to combine several rooms into one large program space. This allowed us to have a better line of sight on all our clients and provide a safer environment. We also revamped our cafeteria area and handicap accessible bathrooms. • Organizational capacity and vision: In 2012 the board of DP made a major commitment to reach out to our community partners and stakeholders. A conscious effort has been made to by a Presentation Committee and the development of a Community Outreach Department to meet with local non-profit boards, school districts, parents, local businesses and government and advocacy groups to present our new vision (Enriching Lives. Strengthening Communities) and promote transparency. • Merchant and property owner leadership: Besides Senior Choice, DP has upgraded office space for Continuum of Colorado staff. We are building a state-of-the art facility to offer and provide home health worker training to all Home Health Agencies in the metro area. • Neighborhood and community engagement: We recently installed a new sign in front of our Aurora location. We have intentionally left spaces to add new businesses. We would like to offer tenant space to other personal care type businesses the will add value to the overall services to our clients and the community.
Lone Tree's RidgeGate Community
Lone Tree's RidgeGate Community
RidgeGate is a sustainable community that is evolving where the city meets the prairie, an eco-smart blend of urban and open space. Its location in Lone Tree places it in one of the most thriving regions in the Denver metropolitan area. Retail, dining, and office centers are all within walking distance of diverse homes in village settings. Urban amenities, open space bluffs, parks and mountain views all make RidgeGate a community designed for health, wellness and peace of mind. RidgeGate is developing according to plan as a compact, mixed-use community where people live, work, shop and recreate in a pedestrian-friendly environment. One of the few communities that continued to grow during the recent recession, RidgeGate will eventually span 3,500 acres, just south of Lincoln Avenue, straddling both sides of I-25. The community will continue to develop carefully, with a long-term commitment to walkability, livability, access, amenities and overall quality of life. Convenient access to transportation is a high priority, with an existing RTD light rail station near Lincoln Avenue serving the community, and three more stations planned within the RidgeGate boundaries. RidgeGate offers a diverse blend of homes, including apartments, townhomes, courtyard patio homes, and detached single-family homes. Over 1,000 homes have been built or are under construction. RidgeGate is home to the first all-solar neighborhood in Colorado. The growing Lincoln Commons center features a Sprouts Farmers Market, several restaurants and a Super Target. RidgeGate Commons, the community’s newest retail district, will be home to the sporting goods leader Cabela’s, scheduled to open in August 2013. The Sky Ridge Medical Center is the anchor to a growing medical sector in Lone Tree. The hospital plans to break ground on a 90-bed expansion in just a few months. A new hotel opened in December 2012 and another will be under construction in 2013. Finally, as further testimony of the true mixed-use Live Work Play character of RidgeGate, Charles Schwab recently announced the development of new a corporate campus, bringing 2,500 jobs to the heart of the community. The LEED-certified Lone Tree Arts Center opened in August 2011 and has become a model for the performing arts by collaborating with some of the premier Colorado performing arts companies to present their productions in Lone Tree as well as presenting national and regional tours. The Lone Tree Recreation Center has been serving the greater Lone Tree community since 2004. Over 1,000 acres in RidgeGate have been devoted to parks, trails, wildlife habitat and open space, with the community flanked by the dramatic vistas of Bluffs Regional Park. RidgeGate’s focus is to provide a living, working and playing environment that contributes to the health and wellness of all residents.
Town of Bennett Comprehensive Plan
Town of Bennett Comprehensive Plan
The Bennett Comprehensive Plan is a bold vision for community planning with achievable goals that immediately enable the Town and its regional stakeholders to cooperatively guide future land use in the eastern I-70 corridor. Several factors make the Bennett 2012 Comprehensive plan project outstanding: 1. A bold vision for community planning. The Town of Bennett is uniquely positioned to capture the next wave of growth of the Denver metropolitan area. Bennett’s close proximity to Denver International Airport, Front Range Airport, I –70, E-470, and the Union Pacific Railroad are all factors which will have a direct impact on the future growth of the Town, an incorporated area that currently totals 5.4 square miles. Bennett’s community leaders are visionary and took bold steps to secure the Town’s future. As a first step in implementing recommendations from a study recently completed for the I-70 Regional Economic Advancement Partnership, the Town identified a 91.4-square-mile comprehensive plan study area. Bennett, with a 2010 population of just 2,300 residents, engaged representatives of Adams County, Arapahoe County, the City of Aurora, and the Denver Regional Council of Governments in a planning process that fostered intergovernmental coordination and cooperation. 2. A focus on achievable goals. The Bennett 2012 Comprehensive Plan is structured around a Preferred Scenario that serves as the heart of the plan, and eight plan themes: Neighborhoods, Employment, Open Lands, Transportation, Services and Infrastructure, Community Health, Annexation, and Intergovernmental Relations. Each plan theme contains a single achievable goal, and each achievable goal is supported by a key strategy, catalyst action and one or more policy directives. By focusing elected and appointed officials throughout the eastern I-70 corridor on what is achievable, and limiting the number of strategies and actions to those that are vitally important, plan implementation is immediately activated and objectives can be accomplished in a much shorter period of time than is typical of a traditional comprehensive plan. 3. A bias for action. To be successful, comprehensive planning must be an ongoing activity. Plan monitoring involves establishing accountability tools for tracking progress over time. The 2012 Bennett Comprehensive Plan includes a progress matrix, a basic plan monitoring tool that identifies timeframes for the accomplishment of catalyst actions: short-term (one to three years), mid-term (three to five years), and long-term (five years and beyond). 4. A planning document designed for effective communication. The 2012 Bennett Comprehensive Plan is formatted as a 16-page letter-sized booklet. The booklet contains text and graphics describing achievable goals, key strategies, catalyst actions and policy directives, with a full color preferred scenario map as its centerpiece. The "summary style" comprehensive planning document provides a straight-forward, cost-effective, and user-friendly synopsis of the Town's land use planning objectives. Multiple copies can be easily produced, distributed and understood very quickly by citizens, public officials and project applicants.
TAXI Community
TAXI Community
Since Zeppelin Development completed the original Yellow Cab building redevelopment in 2000, the TAXI site in the industrial zone of Northeast Denver has become home to hundreds of new economy entrepreneurs. Tenants at TAXI include graphic design firms, architecture firms including award-winning 4240 Architecture, and creative startups like Craftsy.com, an online education site focused on knitting and quilting. TAXI also continually provides an inspiring and creative environment for events. This past summer, over 50 events took place at TAXI including the Urban Land Institute, National Real Estate Editors, City Council of Salt Lake City, Early Childhood Education Conference, National Water Conference, any number of charitable organizations, food trucks, and a multitude of small groups who seek out TAXI for stimulation. TAXI is a community that understands the importance of providing spaces to live, work, and play. In addition to creative office spaces and “crash pad” residences, amenities such as a fitness center, early childhood education center, pool, salon, plazas, gardens, coffee shop, and two restaurants contribute to TAXI’s daily livability. The spirit of creative collaboration and place-making that began at TAXI has since created a ripple effect throughout RiNo. The River North neighborhood has seen increasing reinvestment along the Brighton Boulevard corridor and Larimer Street. Film studios, galleries, restaurants and cafes have sprung up in former warehouses, auto garages, and manufacturing plants in recent years. Additionally, Zeppelin Development is building an indoor artisan market on Brighton Boulevard called The Source. Housed in a brick 1880s iron foundry, The Source will include a butcher, cheese counter, coffee roaster, brewer, and other craft food producers and purveyors all within a soaring industrial space. Zeppelin Development is actively working with the city and other interests to realize lateral pedestrian and bicycle connections between TAXI, Upper Larimer, and Brighton Boulevard in order to help stitch the neighborhood together and allow the broader community to take advantage of The Source and TAXI’s on-site services. Collaboration with RNOs such as RiNo Neighbors, the RiNo Arts District, and others is prioritized as well in these and other efforts towards exporting TAXI’s successes and making the neighborhood truly livable. As new properties are developed at the TAXI site, an increasing critical mass of high-tech firms and creative economy businesses that prioritize community and livability for their employees are transforming RiNo into Denver’s creative epicenter. TAXI is committed to continually pushing the creative place-making envelope.
Colorado Wedding District
Colorado Wedding District
The Colorado Wedding District is located in the heart of downtown Castle Rock. It was established to capture a niche market that is seemingly recession-proof. The goals are oriented toward the entire community. Long-term, the Downtown Development Authority will generate an atmosphere that lends itself to one-stop shopping for weddings. This concept not only provides products and services for those planning their special day, it also brings more guests to downtown Castle Rock. As the concept continues to evolve, downtown merchants will have the opportunity to capture the attention of newlyweds seeking to set up their homes, or grow their families. Additionally, guests will be exposed to the vast array of dining and entertainment options that anchor the community. Ultimately, the increased awareness of all that is happening in downtown Castle Rock will have a positive ripple effect throughout the community. This concept has local, regional, and state-wide economic development and tourism implications. The momentum among present businesses is blossoming and many outside merchants are vying to be a part of the district. Downtown Castle Rock is the place to be and one to watch!
Centennial Center Park
Centennial Center Park
The 11-acre Centennial Center Park is the first City-owned and developed Park; the project was completed on schedule and under budget. Centennial Center Park is located in the center of Centennial on the north side of Arapahoe at Revere Parkway. This location was specifically chosen to provide recreation opportunities for neighborhoods and communities underserved by park facilities, and to establish a central location where citizens throughout the City could come together. The Park not only serves residents of Centennial and Arapahoe County but draws citizens from throughout the metro Denver area. A number of needs were identified by both the City and the public during the Park planning process. The Park site was acquired in early 2008, and a master plan was completed in 2009 after an extensive public outreach effort. As part of the planning process, citizens were given the opportunity to identify the types of uses and facilities they wanted in the Park. Residents expressed a lack of park facilities and recreational features, including children’s playgrounds, climbing walls, water play features and picnic facilities. The resulting plan for the Park reflected the community's vision and responded to the citizens' needs for recreation. Centennial Center Park is designed for year-round, family-friendly enjoyment. The site has many natural attributes that make it an exceptional location, including spectacular mountain vistas; changes in topography that create distinctive places; and access to the Lone Tree Creek drainage, which has the potential to provide riparian habitat and access to the region's park, open space and trail network. The Park’s features include playgrounds, water play areas, an outdoor amphitheatre, a plaza, picnic shelters, restrooms, mountain view overlooks, environmental and historical education exhibits, open space meadows, a butte, a native plant demonstration garden, climbing walls, walking trails, parking and entry gateways that provide an identity for the Park and community. Many of the materials used in the construction of the Park were found locally. The surface of the playground consists of 'poured in place’ rubber surfacing, which is made of recycled materials that provide a safe, clean, attractive and ADA accessible environment for children. Centennial Center Park opened April 27, 2012 and its success quickly became apparent. Within the first nine months, thousands visited the Park and more than 200 events were coordinated by citizens throughout the Denver metro area. In addition to numerous private events, the City of Centennial hosted three public events that were attended by thousands, including local public officials, Governor Hickenlooper and several Olympians. The usage of the Park during the first year was so high the City constructed more than 200 additional parking spaces to meet public demand. Funding and support for the $5.3 million Centennial Center Park came from a variety of sources, including Great Outdoors Colorado, DORA (Waste Tire Program), CenCON (an umbrella organization of 53 homeowner organizations and civic organizations), the Centennial Rotary Club and numerous other business and community partners.
Washington Village Cohousing
Washington Village Cohousing
Washington Village is a new cohousing neighborhood, under construction, located next to a small neighborhood park at Cedar and 13th Street in central Boulder, Colorado that features diversity in housing types, scales of economy and within its culture. Our construction consists of a historic elementary school (adaptive reuse – 8 condos), single family homes, duplexes, town houses and flats; all of which exists under one condo map. On site there will be 8000 SF of common space consisting of 2 large gathering spaces, a large kitchen to support 33 household units (potluck dinners 2 -3 times a week), 2 guest rooms with full baths (for community members to host family and guests), a woodshop and bike repair shop, an arts and crafts room, large gallery space, a cozy library, laundry facilities and a contemplative space. Of the 33 units located on this site 10 are a part of the City of Boulders permanent affordability housing program (6 low-income and 4 middle-income). The diverse culture within Washington Village is reflected in age and experience, making it ripe for knowledge and resource sharing. Whether we are designing for aging in place or for intergenerational communities we are always promoting the highest quality architecture and neighborhood planning in order to create a vibrant atmosphere with a real sense of place. Our design achieves sustainable living in the following ways: • Empowers community members through collaboration and shared resources • Achieves an optimum balance of private and community spaces • Thoughtful designs for courtyards and landscaping elements • Strategically oriented kitchen spaces to connect neighbors • Incorporates Structural Insulated Panels (SIP walls) and Serious Windows (R5 insulation rating) • Designed with clean and elegant interior spaces with quality finishes • Planned Master bedroom suites on the main level (essential for aging in place communities) • Integrates state-of-the-art Passive Solar, Photovoltaic, Geothermal (integrated with Earth Tube technology) and other Net-Zero design concepts utilizing high performance and innovative designs designating this site as a LEED ND certified Intentional Community. This transit oriented development (TOD) is a part of a new urban design that offers more opportunities for residents to access, through various modes of transportation, the “goods” and “services” or destination points that are a part of our daily lives. TOD’s are proving to achieve higher quality of life since they celebrate walking and mass transit rather than emphasize dependencies on cars for mobility. When it comes to aging in place nothing can be more important than having accessibility to cheaper modes of transportation especially when we analyze how our national and local economic structures are maturing in today’s economy, and how those with fixed incomes have to deal with gentrification from the city. Washington Village is placed in a setting that has convenient bus transportation, bike lanes, and sidewalks. It is within walking distance to grocery, local shops, entertainment, restaurants, North Boulder Recreation Center, Boulder Community Hospital, and other amenities. Silver Sage Village Cohousing is a sister community located just north of Washington Village developed for seniors aging in place, it was completed in 2008.
Olde Town Arvada
Olde Town Arvada
Olde Town Arvada is historic jewel that was in need of redevelopment to become the vibrant heart of Arvada it once was. Through the Arvada Urban Renewal Authority (AURA), Arvada started the redevelopment work by redoing the streetscapes on Grandview Avenue and Olde Wadsworth. Concrete sidewalks were replaced with brick pavers and the streets were lined with trees, flower pots, street lamps and benches. AURA also awarded façade grants to 27 property owners to restore their buildings to their original historic look. AURA worked with a private developer to construct three new buildings on the corner of Olde Wadsworth and Grandview. These two-story buildings are now home to exciting new restaurants and retail on the ground floor with office space above. The traditional Town Square was redeveloped through integration into Arvada’s new library and contains an interactive fountain for children of all ages to run through during the summer. Olde Town Square is the centerpiece that hosts most of Olde Town’s 50 annual special events and activities, including the Holiday Tree Lighting, Scarecrow Festival and Farmer’s Market. Finally, AURA awarded the Webster Center project, located caddy corner from the Library, to a local business to construct a two-story office building on the site. AURA’s final major redevelopment effort focused on the improvement of residential opportunities. This focus resulted in the development of Water Tower Village. Located south of Olde Town, the area was blighted with sixteen apartment buildings which suffered from deferred maintenance and a high crime rate. AURA purchased 50 parcels of land, including these apartment buildings and relocated 75 families. The area now houses 600 beautiful row houses, cottages, lofts and luxury apartments. The Village is very pedestrian-oriented with alley-loaded garages, detached sidewalks, tree-lined streets, and two pocket parks. Following the completion of the initial redevelopment effort and sunset of the Urban Renewal Area, development in Olde Town Arvada is continuing. The City worked with private developers to support the renovation of two historic buildings, the A. L. Davis Building on the northeast corner of Olde Wadsworth and Grandview, and the Kars Building on the northeast corner of Olde Wadsworth and Grant. Through renovation and reuse these buildings now house new restaurants, office space and residential loft units. The development of Olde Town will continue in the near future with the coming of the Gold Line in 2016. A public-private partnership is in progress to build a five story, 152-unit high-rise apartment complex on the east side of Olde Town within a short walk to the future Olde Town Station. The Arvada City Council has appropriated over $22 million to support Gold Line “Betterment Projects” ranging from pavers for the Station Plaza to a bus transfer facility and parking structures. The City, AURA and RTD are collaborating in the development of the infrastructure necessary to support Transit-Oriented Development in Olde Town. The redevelopment, restoration, mixed use and multi-modal development of Olde Town is consistent with Metro Vision Goals and Policies.
40 West Arts District, Lakewood, CO
40 West Arts District, Lakewood, CO
The 40 West Arts District showcases what happens when vision, investment, and community and civic leadership converge. Just over three years ago, the idea of an arts district was a fledging thought suggested during a community planning meeting for the Lamar Street Station Area Plan as a way to revitalize an older, eclectic neighborhood and commercial corridor. Because of the strong partnership between the Two Creeks neighborhood, Metro West Housing Solutions (formerly Lakewood Housing Authority), the Lakewood – West Colfax Business Improvement District, the West Colfax Community Association, the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, and the City of Lakewood, the vision became reality. The 40 West Arts District formed as a non-profit and was named an Emerging Creative District by the State of Colorado. The City of Lakewood received a 2012 Gold DRCOG Local Government Award for the 40 West Arts District and related collaborative planning efforts. Since forming, the 40 West Arts District has held a number of highly successful events including INSPIRE! Lakewood’s Arts Week, The 40 West Arts RIOT, the Arts Along Colfax Program, and the 40 West Arts Fall Festival. In addition, several projects and investments have been completed, are underway, or are scheduled for the near future to capitalize on light rail, support affordable housing, promote economic health, and support existing neighborhoods. The projects further implement Metro Vision 2035 by encouraging infill and redevelopment and supporting compact development and a mix of uses that support live, work and play. The following are just a few examples of the ongoing investments and achievements in the 40 West Arts District neighborhood: • A 160-unit mixed-income housing project is being constructed by Metro West Housing Solutions, just steps from the Lamar Street station. • New mixed-use zoning has been adopted to promote high-density residential, retail, live/work units, and art studios. • The 40 West Arts District Urban Design and Mobility Concepts Plan was adopted as an amendment to the Lakewood Comprehensive Plan to further promote and enhance the Lamar Street landscape experience and to redefine the West Colfax Avenue corridor. • Funding has been secured, and plans are underway, to construct a traffic-calming roundabout in the intersection of West 14th Ave. and Lamar Street and to construct an eight-foot sidewalk from Lamar Station to West 14th Ave. The sidewalk will include an enhanced amenity zone to implement the vision of the Lamar Street Station Area Plan and the 40 West Urban Design and Mobility Plan. • A Sustainable Neighborhood Assessment grant, funded through the Environmental Protection Agency, was received, which provided recommendations for sustainable re-development in the 40 West Arts District neighborhood. The 40 West Arts District encompasses the area within approximately ½ mile of the Lamar Street Station, on the W Rail Line, opening in April 2013. It includes the Two Creeks neighborhood, the commercial corridor of West Colfax Avenue, and the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design.
Denver Botanic Gardens, Phases I & II
Denver Botanic Gardens, Phases I & II
In collaboration with Tryba Architects, The Denver Botanic Gardens reached a major milestone in 2007 with the completion and unanimous board-approval of the Master Development Plan. This 25-year roadmap became a strong and important vision for the future of the Gardens. Phases I and II of the Plan began the institutional transformation and included new structures and systems that would both enhance the visitor experience as well as the Gardens’ operations. Created with the Gardens’ core values --- Transformation, Sustainability, Diversity and Relevance --- as the platform, the design and new construction incorporates energy-saving strategies with environmental sustainability. The construction links educational and research components to global initiatives monitoring climate change. Among the works completed: • Bonfils Stanton Visitor’s Center combines all the essentials for visitors -- gift shop, ticketing and information desk -- with an entry courtyard • State-of-the-art interactive production and research greenhouses and Horticultural offices • 3-level green roof parking structure Attendance, membership and support of all kinds remain strong at Denver Botanic Gardens, keeping Denver in the top five most-visited botanic gardens in the country. Attendance is up from 635,000 in 2009 to 819,000 in 2011. The average number of member households in 2011 was 29,000, peaking at 30,000 in April. It was the highest membership count in Gardens’ history. The three-level, 400-foot long garage nestles two full levels into the landscape, selectively exposing portions of its architectural concrete construction between landscaped earthen berms planted with native Colorado grasses and wildflowers. The most dynamic and innovative feature of the parking garage is the Mordecai Children’s Garden. At 20,000 sf, this signature garden emerges from the landscape north of the site to seamlessly integrate into the form and structure of the two-level garage below. Supported by a waterproofed and drained double-slab system, the Children’s Garden is the largest and most successful green roof in the Rocky Mountain region and home to a full range of native Colorado plant species, deciduous and coniferous trees, native grasses and wildflowers, and several water features including a pond. Conceived in concert with the new parking structure immediately opposite York Street, the 4,500 sf Visitor Center is a compact entry pavilion combining a number of service, membership, education and retail functions under a single roof. This Welcome Garden contains a cascading recycled water fountain with runnel, integrated shaded seating areas, and an exterior informational display screen. The interior of the Visitor Center is a single, open planned space with ample west-facing glazing offering views to the gardens beyond. The pavilion houses a gift shop and “book nook”, visitor information desk, informational kiosks, offices public restrooms, and is topped with a 10Kw photovoltaic array supplying 5% of the power requirements.